Can You Help Discover the History of Patient Creativity at St James’ Hospital?

[This story was published on November 13 by Star & Crescent. Read the original story at starandcrescent.org.uk/2017/11/13/can-you-help-discover-the-history-of-patient-creativity-at-st-james-hospital.] Local writer and historian Emily Turner was inspired by the recent Edward King exhibition at Portsmouth City Museum and is running her own research project exploring the creativity of patients in mental health institutions. She would like to include […]

Edward King: patient artist

Yesterday, I visited Portsmouth Museum. I grew up in the area and still live nearby, so I’ve spent many an hour meandering through its galleries. After a particularly dreadful mental health dip, my mother (and fellow history/art enthusiast) shepherded me back down to check out the museum’s current temporary exhibition, which focuses on the work […]

Art and Telegraphy at Scrambled Messages’s Victorians Decoded

One of the images currently being exhibited at Victorians Decoded: Art and Telegraphy, the Guildhall Art Gallery’s current exhibition, is a painting by William Lionel Wyllie. Commerce and Sea Power, painted in 1897, shows sailing barges and steam ships engaged in commerce as the battleship HMS Illustrious is bound for fitting-out in the dockyards at […]

Willkommen, Bienvenue, Welcome

[Image: Nameless and Friendless, 1857, Emily Mary Osborn] Hello, friends, Romans, and lovers of the creative, historical, queer, and macabre! Thank you for taking the time to visit my attempted cabinet of curiosities. For anyone who may have stumbled across this blog and might be wondering who I am, my name is Emily, I’m a writer […]

Tales from the Archives: Pub’s place in history of Sussex smugglers

This story was published on July 21 in the Observer series. Read the original story at chichester.co.uk/news/local/nostalgia-pub-s-place-in-history-of-sussex-smugglers-1-7486021] [All images: West Sussex Record Office] Inns around the Sussex and Hampshire coast and countryside were often used as resting places by smugglers, and back in the 18th century what is now known as the Royal Oak at Langstone […]